Draft Information Flier for Girls Robotics Summer Camps

Well, it’s looking like it’s going to be more and more of a reality. As we approach the end of February and wrap-up a successful week of touring at Ferris Intermediate with the FTC 11242 robot, it’s time to get an information flier ready for our girls robotics summer camps.

Still have a few logistical issues to iron-down and these fliers will be ready for prime-time. Hopefully, they’ll be ready to go out this time next week.

Number Conversions from Base 10

I have written a few posts (Post 1, Post 2, & Post 3) concerning various base number systems. In all of these posts, I covered how to convert from a non-decimal base into a decimal base. In other words, I covered how to get INTO base-10. This post is going to cover the inverse (decimal base into non-decimal base).

Modulus

We will need to start by reviewing the concept of modulus division. Let’s look at the standard division problem 5/2. We would typically say that the answer is 2.5 and this would be correct.

Now, modulus is simply the remainder of a division problem. Go back to when you were first introduced to division. In Texas, this is typically in 4th grade. Let’s take a look at that division problem of 5/2 again. When you were learning division, you would have said the answer was 2r1. The 1 is the modulus. When we’re writing the problem to just solve modulus, we would write it as 5%2.

Mechanics

Decimal to Octal

Let’s say that we have the decimal number (base 10) 4,814 and we want to convert it to an octal (base 8).

We will be building the number from right-to-left. The first thing we will do is solve 4,814/8. This equals 601r6. So, our first digit of the solution (starting on the right) is 6.

6

Now, we solve 601/8, which equals 75r1. So, our second digit of the solution (floating from right-to-left) is 1.

16

Now, we solve 75/8, which equals 9r3. So, our third digit of the solution (floating from right-to-left) is 3.

316

Now, we solve 9/8, which equals 1r1. So, out fourth digit of the solution (floating from right-to-left) is 1.

1316

Finally, we solve 1/8, which equals 0r1. So, our fifth and final digit of the solution (floating from right-to-left) is 1.

11316

So, the decimal number (base 10) 4,814 is equal to the octal (base 8) 11316.

As you can see, this is a bit of a process, but once you know the process, it is very simple. I now want to take a look at going to number systems with more digits than base 10, for example: base 16.

Decimal to Hexadecimal

Let’s say that we have the decimal number (base 10) 4,814 and we want to convert it to a HEX (base 16).

We start by solving 4,814/16, which gives us 300r14. Remember, that is number systems with more than 10 digits, we start using letters.

10 = A
11 = B
12 = C
13 = D
14 = E
15 = F

So, the first digit of our solution (building from right-to-left) is E.

E

Now, we solve 300/16, which gives us 18r12. So, the second digit of our solutions (building from right-to-left) is C.

CE

Now, we solve 18/16, which gives us 1r2. So, the third digit of our solution (building from right-to-left) is 2.

2CE

Finally, we solve 1/16, which gives us 0r1. So, the fourth digit of our solution (building from right-to-left) is 1.

12CE

So, the decimal number (base 10) 4,814 is equal to the hexadecimal (base 16) 12CE.

CS1 07-Feb-2018 to 13-Feb-2018

Lesson Name:

Women Pioneers in Computer Science

TEKS – §126.33 (Computer Science 1):

  • c.1 – Creativity and innovation. The student develops products and generates new understandings by extending existing knowledge. The student is expected to:
  • c.1.C – participate in relevant, meaningful activities in the larger community and society to create electronic projects.
  • c.5 – Digital citizenship. The student explores and understands safety, legal, cultural, and societal issues relating to the use of technology and information. The student is expected to:
  • c.5.E – investigate how technology has changed and the social and ethical ramifications of computer usage.

Lesson Objectives:

  1. The student will be able to identify key women pioneers in the field of Computer Science
  2. The student will be able to identify the contributions of women pioneers in the field of Computer Science

Materials Needed:

  1. Group Assignments
  2. Pioneers Assigned to Research

Description of Lesson:

Students will be assigned to groups and each group will be assigned a woman pioneer in Computer Science to research.

Each group will have two (2) full class sessions to develop a presentation about their assigned pioneer.

The presentation can be in any media the group chooses (PowerPoint, song, round table discussion, Socratic seminar, etc…). The presentations will be conducted on the 3rd day of the project.

Grade(s):

  • Major Grade – Project Presentation

PAE 05-Feb-2018 to 09-Feb-2018

Lesson Name:

Women Pioneers in Engineering

TEKS – §130.402 (Principles of Applied Engineering):

  • c.2 – The student investigates the components of engineering and technology systems. The student is expected to:
  • c.2.A – investigate and report on the history of engineering science

Lesson Objectives:

  1. The student will be able to identify key women pioneers in the field of Engineering
  2. The student will be able to identify the contributions of women pioneers in the field of Engineering

Materials Needed:

  1. Group Assignments
  2. Pioneers Assigned to Research

Description of Lesson:

Students will be assigned to groups and each group will be assigned a woman pioneer in Engineering to research.

Each group will have four (4) full class sessions to develop a presentation about their assigned pioneer.

The presentation can be in any media the group chooses (PowerPoint, song, round table discussion, Socratic seminar, etc…). The presentations will be conducted on the 5th day of the project.

Grade(s):

  • Major Grade – Project Presentation