Interactive Circuits Lab

Today in PAE, we did an interactive circuits lab. I assigned the students to create 3 different circuits from the PHET Interactive Circuit Construction Kit: DC – Virtual Lab hosted by University of Colorado – Boulder.

Circuit 1 was a simple series circuit consisting of two lights, two batteries, and a switch:

Circuit 2 was a somewhat easy series circuit consisting of one light, three batteries, a switch, and a 120 Ohm resistor:

Circuit 3 was a parallel circuit consisting of three lights, each controlled independently with a switch:

Circuit 4 was a parallel circuit identical to circuit 3, but had a series “master switch” in it:

Circuit 5 was a short circuit with an over-heated power supply:

The students appeared to have fun with the lab and were engaged the entire class time. Thank you UC-Boulder for this nice interactive tool!

Working with Resistor Color Bands

Today, in PAE, we did a lab where we were looking at resistor color bands.

With this particular resistor, we have color band 1 is green, color band 2 is violet, color band 3 is red, and color band 4 if silver.

On bands 1 and 2, the colors represent the following:

Color Value
Black 0
Brown 1
Red 2
Orange 3
Yellow 4
Green 5
Blue 6
Violet 7
Gray 8
White 9

The 3rd band represents the multiplier.

Color Value
Black 1
Brown 1 x 101
Red 1 x 102
Orange 1 x 103
Yellow 1 x 104
Green 1 x 105
Blue 1 x 106
Violet 1 x 107
Gold 1 x 10-1
Silver 1 x 10-2

The final band relates to the tolerance.

Color Value
Blank +/- 20%
Silver +/- 10%
Gold +/- 5%

So, the example above would be the following values:

5 , 7 , 1 x 102 , +-/10%

That would be 57 x 1010Ω with a tolerable variance of +/- 10%.

10% of 57 x 1010Ω is 57Ω. So to calculate the total range, we would do the following:

57 x 1010Ω + 57Ω = Upper Range

57 x 1010Ω – 57Ω = Lower Range

So, the resistor in the example would have a total operating range of:

627Ω to 513Ω

Lesson Plans – Week of 2018-03-04

Lesson Plans – Week of 2018-03-04

  • (1 A/B) Principles of Applied Engineering
  • (2A) Computer Science 1
  • (2B) Computer Science 2
  • (3A) Robotics 1 / Robotics 2 / FTC 11242
  • (3B) Robotics 1 / Robotics 2 / FTC 12645
  • (4A) Computer Science 1
  • (5 A/B) Principles of Applied Engineering

Eric Evans – Planboard Week – 2018-03-04

Lesson Plans – Week of 2018-02-25

Lesson Plans – Week of 2018-02-25

  • (1 A/B) Principles of Applied Engineering
  • (2A) Computer Science 1
  • (2B) Computer Science 2
  • (3A) Robotics 1 / Robotics 2 / FTC 11242
  • (3B) Robotics 1 / Robotics 2 / FTC 12645
  • (4A) Computer Science 1
  • (5 A/B) Principles of Applied Engineering

Eric Evans – Planboard Week – 2018-02-25

Lesson Plans – Week of 2018-02-18

Lesson Plans – Week of 2018-02-18

  • (1 A/B) Principles of Applied Engineering
  • (2A) Computer Science 1
  • (2B) Computer Science 2
  • (3A) Robotics 1 / Robotics 2 / FTC 11242
  • (3B) Robotics 1 / Robotics 2 / FTC 12645
  • (4A) Computer Science 1
  • (5 A/B) Principles of Applied Engineering

Eric Evans – Planboard Week – 2018-02-18

PAE 05-Feb-2018 to 09-Feb-2018

Lesson Name:

Women Pioneers in Engineering

TEKS – §130.402 (Principles of Applied Engineering):

  • c.2 – The student investigates the components of engineering and technology systems. The student is expected to:
  • c.2.A – investigate and report on the history of engineering science

Lesson Objectives:

  1. The student will be able to identify key women pioneers in the field of Engineering
  2. The student will be able to identify the contributions of women pioneers in the field of Engineering

Materials Needed:

  1. Group Assignments
  2. Pioneers Assigned to Research

Description of Lesson:

Students will be assigned to groups and each group will be assigned a woman pioneer in Engineering to research.

Each group will have four (4) full class sessions to develop a presentation about their assigned pioneer.

The presentation can be in any media the group chooses (PowerPoint, song, round table discussion, Socratic seminar, etc…). The presentations will be conducted on the 5th day of the project.

Grade(s):

  • Major Grade – Project Presentation

PAE 23-Jan-2018 to 02-Feb-2018

Lesson/Unit Name:

Materials Engineering

TEKS – §130.402 (Principles of Applied Engineering):

  • c.2 – The student investigates the components of engineering and technology systems. The student is expected to:
  • c.2.F – conduct and present research on emerging and innovative technology
  • c.3 – The student presents conclusions, research findings, and designs using a variety of media throughout the course. The student is expected to:
  • c.3.A – use clear and concise written, verbal, and visual communication techniques
    c.4 – The student uses appropriate tools and demonstrates safe work habits. The student is expected to:
  • c.4.C – recognize the classification of hazardous materials and wastes
  • c.4.D – dispose of hazardous materials and wastes appropriately
  • c.4.F –  describe the implications of negligent or improper maintenance
  • c.5 – The student describes the factors that affect the progression of technology and the potential intended and unintended consequences of technological advances. The student is expected to:
  • c.5.A – describe how technology has affected individuals, societies, cultures, economies, and environments
  • c.5.C – describe how and why technology progresses
  • c.6 – The student thinks critically and applies fundamental principles of system modeling and design to multiple design projects. The student is expected to:
  • c.6.B – identify the chemical, mechanical, and physical properties of engineering materials
  • c.6.D – use consistent units for all measurements and computations

Lesson Objectives:

  1. The student will be able to identify different types of materials (metal, ceramic, polymer, composite, and other) by their characteristics.
  2. The student will be able to identify alternative materials for products to be composed of and the advantages and disadvantages of each proposed alternative.
  3. The student will be able to identify the various properties of different materials.
  4. The student will be able to demonstrate mastery of materials engineering concepts by developing a material concept to protect items in transport on a pallet.

Materials Needed:

  1. Pre-Test, Vocabulary Activity, Key Terms Shared Document, Lab 9.1
  2. Lab 9.2
  3. Lab 9.3, Various Materials for Testing/Observation
  4. Lab 9.4

Description of Lesson:

Students will be introduced on the first day of the lesson to the start-of-unit activities and various types of materials (metal, ceramic, polymer, composite, and other). Students will complete Lab 9.1 as homework that is due by 26-January-2018.

Students will be introduced to the concept that products can be made of alternative materials and there are advantages and disadvantages to all materials.

Students will be introduced to different properties of materials, such as physical, mechanical, electro-magnetic, chemical, thermal, and optical/acoustical. Students will research the properties for various given materials.

Students will be assigned a task of creating a lightweight material that can wrap products placed on a wooden transport pallet. The materials must be protected from the elements and must be held stable on the pallet. Students will present their ideas to the class at the conclusion of the project.

Grade(s):

  • 23-Jan-2018
    • Daily Grade – Pre-Test
    • Daily Grade – Key Terms
    • Daily Grade – Vocabulary Activity
    • Minor Grade – Lab 9.1 (Due 26-Jan-2018)
  • 24-Jan-2018
    • Daily Grade – Lab 9.2
  • 25-Jan-2018
    • Daily Grade – Lab 9.3
  • 26-Jan-2018
    • Minor Grade – Lab 9.5 Problem Definition
  • 29-Jan-2018 to 02-Feb-2018
    • Major Grade – Lab 9.5 Full Solution

PAE 09-Jan-2018 to 19-Jan-2018

Lesson/Unit Name:

Mechanical Engineering

TEKS – §130.402 (Principles of Applied Engineering):

  • c.2 – The student investigates the components of engineering and technology systems. The student is expected to:
  • c.2.D – describe how technological systems interact to achieve common goals
  • c.2.E – compare and contrast engineering, science, and technology careers
  • c.3 – The student presents conclusions, research findings, and designs using a variety of media throughout the course. The student is expected to:
  • c.3.A – use clear and concise written, verbal, and visual communication techniques
  • 3.D – use industry standard visualization techniques and media
    c.4 – The student uses appropriate tools and demonstrates safe work habits. The student is expected to:
  • c.4.A – master relevant safety tests
  • c.4.G – demonstrate the use of precision measuring instruments
  • c.5 – The student describes the factors that affect the progression of technology and the potential intended and unintended consequences of technological advances. The student is expected to:
  • c.5.B – describe how the development and use of technology influenced past events
  • c.6 – The student thinks critically and applies fundamental principles of system modeling and design to multiple design projects. The student is expected to:
  • c.6.D – use consistent units for all measurements and computations
  • c.8 – The student understands the opportunities and careers in fields related to electrical and mechanical systems. The student is expected to:
  • c.8.A – describe the applications of electrical and mechanical systems
  • c.8.B – describe career opportunities in electrical and mechanical systems
  • c.8.C – identify emerging trends in electrical and mechanical systems

Lesson Objectives:

  1. The student will be able to define key terms relating to materials engineering.
  2. The student will be able to identify different types of motion by their characteristics.
  3. The student will be able to complete calculations to determine work, pressure, power and/or torque of a given system.
  4. The student will be able to identify key power systems on a given mechanical system.
  5. The student will be able to build a mechanical system to complete a given task.

Materials Needed:

  1. Pre-Test, Vocabulary Activity, Key Terms Shared Document, Lab 8.1
  2. Lab 8.2, FTC 12645 Robot, FTC 11242 Robot
  3. Lab 8.3
  4. Lab 8.4, LEGO Mindstorm EV3 Kits with Pre-Programmed Bricks

Description of Lesson:

Students will be introduced on the first day of the lesson to the start-of-unit activities and various types of motion (linear, rotary, reciprocating, and oscillating). Students will complete Lab 8.1 as homework that is due by 12-January-2018.

Students will be introduced to power systems. Students will identify the power system, transmission device(s), control device(s), and output device(s) on either the FTC 11242 or FTC 12645 competition robots.

Students will be introduced to the concepts of calculating work, pressure, power, and torque. Students will complete a series of calculations given set data and formulas.

Students will be assigned a task of creating a mouse-trap powered car. Students will only be given the mousetrap and must provide the rest of their supplies.

Grade(s):

  • 09-Jan-2018
    • Daily Grade – Pre-Test
    • Daily Grade – Key Terms
    • Daily Grade – Vocabulary Activity
    • Minor Grade – Lab 8.1 (Due 12-Jan-2018)
  • 10-Jan-2018
    • Daily Grade – Lab 8.2
  • 11-Jan-2018
    • Daily Grade – Lab 8.3
  • 12-Jan-2018
    • Minor Grade – Lab 8.4 Problem Definition
  • 16-Jan-2018 to 19-Jan-2018
    • Major Grade – Lab 8.4 Full Solution

STEAM: Wisdom from the Front Lines

Region 10Today, I had the opportunity to attend a professional development entitled STEAM: Wisdom from the Front Lines that was held at Brookhaven College and coordinated by Education Service Center: Region 10.

The training brought together, in a single room, STEAM educators from secondary and higher ed in an Ed Camp formatted one-day conference. While K-12 and higher ed coordinate with each other at the higher levels, they rarely coordinate at the local level. Today was a first for many of us.

We got to hear what higher ed would like in our graduates and they gave us ideas on projects and programs that we could implement to get them there. It was very insightful and helpful.

On a selfish note, I have recruited an additional team to our robotics league from Faith Family Academy in Waxahachie!

Roster First Glance & Gender Inequality

I now have my first glance at my rosters today in Skyward.

Here is how it looks right now:

  • 1st Period – Principles of Applied Engineering
    • 16 TOTAL (13 Males / 3 Females)
  • 5th Period – Principles of Applied Engineering
    • 16 TOTAL (16 Males / 0 Females)
  • 2A – Computer Science 1
    • 15 TOTAL (13 Males / 2 Females)
  • 4A – Computer Science 1
    • 12 TOTAL (10 Males / 2 Females)
  • 2B – Computer Science 2
    • 8 TOTAL (8 Males / 0 Females)
  • 3A – Robotics 1
    • 19 TOTAL (13 Males / 6 Females)
  • 3B – Robotics 1
    • 20 TOTAL (17 Males / 3 Females)
  • 3A – Robotics 2
    • 7 TOTAL (6 Males / 1 Female)
  • 3B – Robotics 2
    • 5 TOTAL (4 Males / 1 Female)

Converting these to percentages, this means that 9.28% of my Principles of Applied Engineering, 14.81% of my Computer Science 1, 23.08% of my Robotics 1, and 16.67% of my Robotics 2 classes are female.

A study from Jensen and Nutt shows 74% of females have interest in engineering technology ahead of entry to junior high. At conclusion of high school that interested drops to 2%.

Considering setting my 2017/2018 professional goal to be to develop a program that encourages more females into STEM.

According to US Dept of Ed 2015 study, 10.4% of males earned an engineering STEM credit compared to 2% of females.

Proposing 3 All-Girls STEM Camps for 2018:

  • Camp 1 – Completed 4th / 5th Grade
  • Camp 2 – Completed 6th Grade
  • Camp 3 – Completed 7th / 8th Grade

The major groups to support would be camps 1 and 2.