Continuing the Matrix

Today, we continued the matrix (2-dimensional array) in Python in Computer Science 1. We added an additional 88 data points to the existing 44 we started with. This brings the total number of points to 132.

See the post entitled “Starting a Matrix in Python” for the first part of the program code.

Now, we are going to remove lines 48 through 58 of the code to continue entering data.

teams[0][4] = 6
teams[1][4] = 0
teams[2][4] = 2
teams[3][4] = 6
teams[4][4] = 6
teams[5][4] = 4
teams[6][4] = 10
teams[7][4] = 6
teams[8][4] = 6
teams[9][4] = 4
teams[10][4] = 0
teams[0][5] = 210
teams[1][5] = 105
teams[2][5] = 132
teams[3][5] = 183
teams[4][5] = 212
teams[5][5] = 184
teams[6][5] = 220
teams[7][5] = 156
teams[8][5] = 160
teams[9][5] = 164
teams[10][5] = 0

Here, we are adding the scores for each team from the first league meet of the 2017/2018 season as new columns 4 and 5 to the array. You can see these are being entered as integers as we will be doing some math with them later.

teams[0][6] = 6
teams[1][6] = 4
teams[2][6] = 4
teams[3][6] = 10
teams[4][6] = 2
teams[5][6] = 0
teams[6][6] = 6
teams[7][6] = 4
teams[8][6] = 4
teams[9][6] = 0
teams[10][6] = 0
teams[0][7] = 257
teams[1][7] = 257
teams[2][7] = 220
teams[3][7] = 314
teams[4][7] = 205
teams[5][7] = 0
teams[6][7] = 238
teams[7][7] = 277
teams[8][7] = 224
teams[9][7] = 0
teams[10][7] = 0

We are now adding the scores from each team from the second league meet of the 2017/2018 season as new columns 6 and 7 to the array.

teams[0][8] = 6
teams[1][8] = 6
teams[2][8] = 6
teams[3][8] = 6
teams[4][8] = 4
teams[5][8] = 6
teams[6][8] = 6
teams[7][8] = 6
teams[8][8] = 0
teams[9][8] = 2
teams[10][8] = 6
teams[0][9] = 188
teams[1][9] = 168
teams[2][9] = 156
teams[3][9] = 218
teams[4][9] = 160
teams[5][9] = 202
teams[6][9] = 244
teams[7][9] = 184
teams[8][9] = 156
teams[9][9] = 152
teams[10][9] = 140

We are now adding the scores from each teams from the third league meet of the 2017/2018 season as new columns 8 and 9 to the array.

teams[0][10] = 5
teams[1][10] = 8
teams[2][10] = 3
teams[3][10] = 7
teams[4][10] = 2
teams[5][10] = 6
teams[6][10] = 6
teams[7][10] = 3
teams[8][10] = 2
teams[9][10] = 0
teams[10][10] = 8
teams[0][11] = 400
teams[1][11] = 312
teams[2][11] = 363
teams[3][11] = 400
teams[4][11] = 346
teams[5][11] = 332
teams[6][11] = 330
teams[7][11] = 413
teams[8][11] = 289
teams[9][11] = 0
teams[10][11] = 267

We now add the results from the league tournament final qualifying rounds of the 2017/2018 season as new columns 10 and 11 to the array.

Now, what we need to do is calculate the total qualifying points, which determines placement. This is done by calculating the sum of all qualifying points for each team individually. This was stored in columns 4, 6, 8, & 10 in the array.

In the event of a tie in the qualifying points, we take the sum of the 3 highest ranking points scores for each team. The team with the higher ranking points wins the tie-break. The ranking points are stored in columns 5, 7, 9, & 11 in the array.

Calculating the qualifying points for each team is somewhat easy and can be done using simple arithmetic functions.

teams[0][12] = teams[0][4] + teams[0][6] + teams[0][8] + teams [0][10]
teams[1][12] = teams[1][4] + teams[1][6] + teams[1][8] + teams [1][10]
teams[2][12] = teams[2][4] + teams[2][6] + teams[2][8] + teams [2][10]
teams[3][12] = teams[3][4] + teams[3][6] + teams[3][8] + teams [3][10]
teams[4][12] = teams[4][4] + teams[4][6] + teams[4][8] + teams [4][10]
teams[5][12] = teams[5][4] + teams[5][6] + teams[5][8] + teams [5][10]
teams[6][12] = teams[6][4] + teams[6][6] + teams[6][8] + teams [6][10]
teams[7][12] = teams[7][4] + teams[7][6] + teams[7][8] + teams [7][10]
teams[8][12] = teams[8][4] + teams[8][6] + teams[8][8] + teams [8][10]
teams[9][12] = teams[9][4] + teams[9][6] + teams[9][8] + teams [9][10]
teams[10][12] = teams[10][4] + teams[10][6] + teams[10][8] + teams [10][10]

As you can see, we have added column 12 to the array and it holds the sum of columns 4, 6, 8, & 10 for the given row. This is the total qualifying points.

We can add a “test-print” using the following:

print(teams[0][0] + " - " + str(teams[0][12]))
print(teams[1][0] + " - " + str(teams[1][12]))
print(teams[2][0] + " - " + str(teams[2][12]))
print(teams[3][0] + " - " + str(teams[3][12]))
print(teams[4][0] + " - " + str(teams[4][12]))
print(teams[5][0] + " - " + str(teams[5][12]))
print(teams[6][0] + " - " + str(teams[6][12]))
print(teams[7][0] + " - " + str(teams[7][12]))
print(teams[8][0] + " - " + str(teams[8][12]))
print(teams[9][0] + " - " + str(teams[9][12]))
print(teams[10][0] + " - " + str(teams[10][12]))

You can see that we are displaying the team number from column 0, concatenated with a space a hyphen and space, which is then concatenated with the values from column 12 cast as a string.

The output looks similar to the following:

Python 3.6.1 (default, Dec 2015, 13:05:11)
[GCC 4.8.2] on linux

127 - 23
5443 - 18
9402 - 15
9403 - 29
10143 - 14
11085 - 16
11242 - 28
12645 - 19
12650 - 12
12992 - 6
13915 - 14

Next class, we will take a look at how to calculate the tie-breaker. As you can see, it will be needed as there is a tie between FTC 10143 and FTC 13915.

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