A Real Final Exam: Computer Science

Well, since entering K-12 education in the 2004/2005 school year, I have now written and administered my first “real” semester exams!

While I have always given exams at the conclusion of the semesters, I have never really given a genuine exam “experience”. There would be a test. That test usually consisted of 50 questions. 25 of the questions were True/False and 25 were Multiple Choice. The students were given a single sentence review guide of “Always Be True to Yourself”.

Now, with that as the review guide, I think you could safely guess that the answers were “B” and “True”. Your guess would be correct. Sadly, I did have students fail that test.

The test was not a “give-me grade” since there was usually a major end-of-year project that the majority of their semester grade was based upon. This final was created so we could simply check a box that said we gave a paper final.

This year, I opted to write and administer a genuine rigorous exam as I was not using any major end-of-year projects.

Computer Science (EOY) Final Exam – Test

Computer Science (EOY) Final Exam – Answer Key

As you can see, this is a bit more rigorous of a test. In fact, all of the questions require a calculated answer.

Once the tests are completed, I will analyze student performance in another post.

Python Recursion and Factorial

As the final Computer Science lesson of the 2016/2017 academic year, I reviewed the somewhat concept of recursion in the Python programming language. In this review, I used the mathematical concept of factorial to discuss recursion.

#Program Name: Recursion Sample
#Programmer Name: Eric Evans, M.Ed.
#Program Description: Provide a functional example of a recursion problem in Computer Science using the mathematical concept of factorial.
#
#Define function named factorial which will have an input value of n.
def factorial(n):
    print("Factorial has been called with n = " + str(n))
    if n == 1:
        return 1
    else:
        result = n * factorial(n-1)
        print(n,"! = ",result)
        return result
#Output the function factorial with an input value of 4.
print(factorial(4))

Let’s pull this concept apart line-by-line.

Lines 1 through 5 and line 14 are comment lines and have no real bearing on the program. They simply exist for documentation purposes.

At line 6, we declare a new function named “factorial” that will receive an input of “n”. This is done using the def or define call in Python. The “factorial” function occupies lines 6 through 13.

On line 7, we output the text “Factorial has been called with n = ” concatenated with the value of “n” cast as a string.

On lines 8 and 9, we enter the first part of a conditional statement. At line 8, we use a Boolean equals to see if “n” is equal to 1. If “n” is equal to 1, then line 8 executes and returns the value “1”.

Line 10 begins the process of addressing what to do if “n” does not equal 1.

On line 11, we declare a variable named “result”, which is defined as the value of “n” multiplied by the value of the “factorial” function with an input value that is one less than the current value of “n”.

Line 12 is simply allowing us to see the factorial value of the current “n” value each time through the loop.

Line 13 returns the value of the variable named “result”.

Line 15 calls the “factorial” function and provides it the necessary input to process. In this case, it is a 4.

Now, let’s see what happens when we run this code:

Factorial has been called with n = 4
Factorial has been called with n = 3
Factorial has been called with n = 2
Factorial has been called with n = 1
2 ! =  2
3 ! =  6
4 ! =  24
24

So, let’s see what’s going on with this output.

Lines 1 through 4 of the output are generated by line 7 of the code. That code displays the static words with the dynamic output of the value of “n”. Notice that each time through the loop, it decremented by 1.

Looking at lines 5 through 7 of the output, we see that the calculations actually start with the lowest factorial number of 2 and increment by 1.

Now, if you notice, the way the calculation was coded on line 11, we are performing the following:

  • (Step 1)  4! = 4 X 3!
    • This is the original problem. Solve for 4!, but it is defined needing to know the value of 3!, which is defined in step 2.
  • (Step 2)  3! = 3 X 2!
    • To solve step 1, we need to know the value of 3!. However, it is defined needing to know the value of 2!, which is defined in step 3.
  • (Step 3)  2! = 2 X 1!
    • To solve step 2, we need to know the value of 2!. However, it is defined needing to know the value of 1!, which is defined in step 4.
  • (Step 4)  1! = 1
    • To solve 3, we need to know the value of 1!. It has a given value of 1.
  • (Step 5)  2! = 2 X 1 = 2
    • Now, that we know the value of 1!, we can calculate the value of 2!.
  • (Step 6)  3! = 3 X 2 = 6
    • Now that we know the value of 2!, we can calculate the value of 3!.
  • (Step 7)  4! = 4 X 6 = 24
    • Now that we know the value of 3!, we can calculate the value of 4!, which was the original problem.

As you can see, the final solution is dependent upon the solution of a previous step, which was dependent upon the solution of a previous step, which was dependent upon the solution of a previous step, which – well you get the idea. This is the basic concept of recursion.