Roster First Glance & Gender Inequality

I now have my first glance at my rosters today in Skyward.

Here is how it looks right now:

  • 1st Period – Principles of Applied Engineering
    • 16 TOTAL (13 Males / 3 Females)
  • 5th Period – Principles of Applied Engineering
    • 16 TOTAL (16 Males / 0 Females)
  • 2A – Computer Science 1
    • 15 TOTAL (13 Males / 2 Females)
  • 4A – Computer Science 1
    • 12 TOTAL (10 Males / 2 Females)
  • 2B – Computer Science 2
    • 8 TOTAL (8 Males / 0 Females)
  • 3A – Robotics 1
    • 19 TOTAL (13 Males / 6 Females)
  • 3B – Robotics 1
    • 20 TOTAL (17 Males / 3 Females)
  • 3A – Robotics 2
    • 7 TOTAL (6 Males / 1 Female)
  • 3B – Robotics 2
    • 5 TOTAL (4 Males / 1 Female)

Converting these to percentages, this means that 9.28% of my Principles of Applied Engineering, 14.81% of my Computer Science 1, 23.08% of my Robotics 1, and 16.67% of my Robotics 2 classes are female.

A study from Jensen and Nutt shows 74% of females have interest in engineering technology ahead of entry to junior high. At conclusion of high school that interested drops to 2%.

Considering setting my 2017/2018 professional goal to be to develop a program that encourages more females into STEM.

According to US Dept of Ed 2015 study, 10.4% of males earned an engineering STEM credit compared to 2% of females.

Proposing 3 All-Girls STEM Camps for 2018:

  • Camp 1 – Completed 4th / 5th Grade
  • Camp 2 – Completed 6th Grade
  • Camp 3 – Completed 7th / 8th Grade

The major groups to support would be camps 1 and 2.

GT/STEM Drone Summer Camp – Day 3

GT STEM Drone Summer CampToday was the 3rd and final day of the GT/STEM Drone Summer Camp at Ferris Junior High School.

Teams had 2 hours to prepare for their attempts at solving the Eureka Dilemma. All attempts were completed before lunch as the forecast high temperature was 102. During the preparation phase, I setup the town of Eureka in the stadium parking lot placing the medical center landing pad at the exact location as written in the directions.

The first team to present a solution to the Eureka Dilemma was the Purple Team. Their flight was fully manual and clipped the medical center on landing. Their cargo pod remained secure.

The second team to present a solution to the Eureka Dilemma was the Green Team. Their flight was fully autonomous with the exception of the landing. They executed a perfect landing with a completely in-tact cargo pod.

The Orange Team created a program to bring their drone out over the stadium and then to turn North into the parking lot.

Unfortunately, their flight ended in a catastrophic crash into the rear of the press box on the stadium. The cargo pod survived the crash, but the drone did not.

In the scale map, the supplies crashed approximately 3 miles Northeast of Silverton, CO – too far for the citizens of Eureka to trek to secure them.

We ended the day creating water bottle rockets. As I could not find my bottle launcher, we dropped the rockets from the press box of the stadium. All bottles were filled with the same volume of water. There was a control rocket (unmodified 2-liter water bottle) and then each team created their own rocket. They had to create a rocket that could reach the ground quicker than the control (reduce drag) and then a rocket that could reach the ground slower than the control (increase drag).

 

GT/STEM Drone Summer Camp – Day 2

Today was Day 2 of the GT/STEM Drone Summer Camp at Ferris Junior High School.

As my G/T Coordinator said I talked too much yesterday, I elected to have my assistant lead the session today.

The goal of today was to perform autonomous programming on the drones in preparation of solving the “Eureka Dilemma”.

Drone Programming Tasks

Students were given blocks of tasks/challenges to complete.

The A-block tasks were somewhat simple and required only straight flights. All teams completed the A-block tasks with the exception of the Orange and Purple drones on task A-4. A reset of the drone and iPads resolved the problem.

The B-block tasks were intermediate level programming which required the drones to fly out to a pre-selected location, land, take-off, and then return to the departure point.

Task B-1 caused problems for all 3 teams as the camera pitch values were invalid and stopped the programs from running. This was resolved by removing the camera instructions.

All teams completed the B-1 task with no problems with the exception of the Purple drone. This drone initiated the RTH (return to home) protocol because the battery level dropped below 5%. Unfortunately, the UAV clipped a tree and somersaulted in the stadium parking lot. The UAV sustained some scratched and dents, but no major damage.

Task B-2 led many students to attempt a dry-run of the Eureka Dilemma. The Purple drone would not accept autonomous programming as it needs a firmware update following the crash. This will be done at the conclusion of the day.

The Orange team attempted a first-draft of the Eureka Dilemma, but drifted into the fence at the baseball field at the departure point and crashed.

The Green team attempted a first-draft of the Eureka Dilemma, ran the length of the West property line, turned 90 degrees to the right, ran along the North property line to the stadium, turned 90 degree to the right, flew South for about 20 feet and then landed, which put it down in the stadium parking lot with no problems.

Many teams also realized they can manually land the drone in the Eureka Dilemma and not need to program the landing.

The C-block tasks were simulated in the lab due to the extreme temperatures outside and the iPads inability to operate in the summer temperatures.

The Purple drone was updated to the latest firmware and was programmed and tested successfully. It is ready for the final day of the camp.

GT/STEM Drone Summer Camp – Day 1

Today was Day 1 of the GT/STEM Drone Summer Camp at Ferris Junior High School.

I opened the morning covering the basic principles of flight and lift. We started with creation of a basic paper helicopter.

We then moved to discuss the following concepts:

  • Lift/Weight
  • Thrust/Drag
  • Pitch
  • Roll
  • Yaw

We also discussed FAA guidelines for hobby flights and what we could and could not fly over and the 400 foot ceiling.

Following lunch, we moved outside to fly in small geofences and then on to free flight. I encouraged students to fly beyond the parking lot and pay attention to the telemetry being returned to the iPads.

Unfortunately, it was hot today and the iPads were shutting down in the heat, which caused a few problems.

When we returned to the room, the students were given the “Eureka Dilemma”, which was the problem the 3-day camp is based upon.

Homework was sent home on the first day that asked students to solve various thrust, drag, lift, and weight calculations.

At the conclusion of the day, the G/T coordinator said I talked too much and should have encouraged the students to research the answers and problems on their own.

GT STEM Camp Challenge Problem

In about a month, I will be leading a GT STEM Camp at Ferris Junior High School! The camp will run July 18th through 20th and will be based upon the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (drones).

I have spent the past few days drafting up the challenge problem they are to solve by the end of the camp.

The Eureka Dilemma

Above is a link to the draft of the challenge problem that I have written for them to solve. Take a look and let me know your opinion on it.

The students this will be given to are students rising into 8th grade and they will be using DroneBlocks for the programming of the drones. The drones to be used are DJI Phantom 3 Standard UAVs.

STEM Program Update – Draft 1

While on my Christmas Break, I have updated the proposal for the STEM program at Ferris High School.

CTE STEM Proposal Update – Draft 1

The proposal update makes several changes from the original proposal submitted at the conclusion of the 2015/2016 academic year.

The proposal, at it currently exists, calls for the following:

  • REMOVE Principles of Technology – TRANSFER to Science Department
  • RENAME Computer Programming I to AP Computer Science I
  • RENAME Computer Programming II to AP Computer Science II
  • RENAME Computer Programming III to Computer Science III
  • ADD Engineering Design & Problem Solving
  • ADD Robotics I Pre-Requisite Course – AP Computer Science I
  • ADD Robotics I Pre-Requisite Course – Engineering Design & Problem Solving

The proposal also makes a strong effort to provide a STEM Endorsement as outlined by HB5.

SCIENCE

HB5 requires that the student must complete 3 required science courses:

  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Physics

In addition, students must complete 2 additional science courses of their choice. We would recommend:

  • Principles of Technology
  • Engineering Design & Problem Solving

MATH

HB5 requires that the student must complete 3 required math courses:

  • Algebra I
  • Geometry
  • Algebra II

In addition, students must complete 2 additional post-Algebra II courses of their choice. We would recommend:

  • AQR or Precalculus
  • AP Computer Science I

TECHNOLOGY/ENGINEERING

HB5 requires that the student must complete 4 courses from a pre-selected list. We would recommend:

  • AP Computer Science I
  • AP Computer Science II
  • Computer Science III
  • Robotics I

The plan also calls for eventually expanding the offerings of additional “overlap” courses such as:

  • Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science (additional math course)
  • Engineering Mathematics (additional math course)

Currently, the proposal is under review by both internal and external sources to verify compliance with HB5.